Brent B. Moritz

Color portrait of Brent B. Moritz

Associate Professor of Supply Chain Management

Department Supply Chain & Information Systems
Office Address 469 Business Building
Phone Number 814-863-7243
Email Address bbm3@psu.edu

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Brent B. Moritz is an Associate Professor of Supply Chain Management. Brent earned his PhD from the Operations and Management Science Department of the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. He also holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Valparaiso University and an MBA (concentrations in Finance and Entrepreneurship) from the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University. Prior to obtaining his PhD, Brent held positions in operations and supply chain management at BorgWarner, Eaton and Parker Hannifin. This also included international experience working in Mexico, England and Germany.

Expertise

Supply Chain Management
Operations Management
Behavioral Operations

Education

Ph D, Business Administration (Operations and Management Science) (Operations and Management Science), University of Minnesota, 2010

MBA, Business (Finance; Entrepreneurship), Case Western Reserve University, 2001

BS, Mechanical Engineering (Manufacturing Management Minor; Christ College Associate (Honors Minor in Humanities and Liberal Arts)), Valparaiso University, 1995

Courses Taught

SCM 450 – Design and Mgt Sc (3)
Strategic design and management of supply chains. SCM 450W Strategic Design and Management of Supply Chains (3) This course is about the strategic design and effective operation of supply chains. It will help prepare you for supply chain management positions in manufacturing, distributing, and other service firms including providers of logistics services. The course focuses on the definition, as well as the application, of a single logic that guides the management of all the supply chain activities. Information decision support systems, primarily computer-based, provide the foundation for this logic. Because the determination of inventory locations and the control of inventory levels play a key role in this logic, we spend considerable time on these subjects. The last section of the course covers ways to lead and organize people to manage cross-firm and cross-functional relationships effectively. After completing this course, students should have the knowledge, skills, and abilities to: • Articulate the process perspective and the total systems view of supply chain management, the impact of systems thinking on firm performance, and the nature of relationships supply chain networks. • Quantify the effect of strategic initiatives such as postponement and risk pooling on the financial performance of the firm, as well as on supply chain performance. • Use and apply selected quantitative tools useful in implementing supply chain strategies. • Explain the complex nature of human interaction needed to successfully introduce supply chain concepts in the firm.This is the prescribed capstone course for the Supply Chain and Information Systems major. It builds upon the fundamental supply chain knowledge, skills, and abilities developed in foundation and intermediate courses. Students must complete SCM 421 before taking this course. SCM 450W is a writing-intensive course. In addition to written assignments encompassing case studies, hands-on exercises, and examinations, student evaluations include oral presentations and class participation.

SCM 450W – Design and Mgt Sc (3)
Strategic design and management of supply chains. SCM 450W Strategic Design and Management of Supply Chains (3) This course is about the strategic design and effective operation of supply chains. It will help prepare you for supply chain management positions in manufacturing, distributing, and other service firms including providers of logistics services. The course focuses on the definition, as well as the application, of a single logic that guides the management of all the supply chain activities. Information decision support systems, primarily computer-based, provide the foundation for this logic. Because the determination of inventory locations and the control of inventory levels play a key role in this logic, we spend considerable time on these subjects. The last section of the course covers ways to lead and organize people to manage cross-firm and cross-functional relationships effectively. After completing this course, students should have the knowledge, skills, and abilities to: • Articulate the process perspective and the total systems view of supply chain management, the impact of systems thinking on firm performance, and the nature of relationships supply chain networks. • Quantify the effect of strategic initiatives such as postponement and risk pooling on the financial performance of the firm, as well as on supply chain performance. • Use and apply selected quantitative tools useful in implementing supply chain strategies. • Explain the complex nature of human interaction needed to successfully introduce supply chain concepts in the firm.This is the prescribed capstone course for the Supply Chain and Information Systems major. It builds upon the fundamental supply chain knowledge, skills, and abilities developed in foundation and intermediate courses. Students must complete SCM 421 before taking this course. SCM 450W is a writing-intensive course. In addition to written assignments encompassing case studies, hands-on exercises, and examinations, student evaluations include oral presentations and class participation.

SCM 406 – Strategic Procurement (3)
Analysis of strategic procurement in the supply chain.

Selected Publications

Quiroga B., Moritz B. B., Ovchinnikov A., "Behavioral Ordering, Competition and Profits: An Experimental Investigation." Production and Operations Management, 2019, pp. 33 pp.
Accepted March 12, 2019
Goodwin P., Moritz B. B., Siemsen E., "Behavioral Forecasting." (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.), 2018, pp. 29, Invited
The Handbook of Behavioral Operations Management
Ovchinnikov A., Moritz B. B., Quiroga B., "How to Compete Against a Behavioral Newsvendor." Production and Operations Management, vol. 24, no. 11, 2015, pp. 1783-1793, onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/poms.12361/abstract
Bansal S., Moritz B. B., "Perceived Versus Actual Value of Substitution: An Experimental Investigation." Journal of Operations Management, vol. 38, 2015, pp. 56-70, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272696315300061
Narayanan A., Moritz B. B., "Decision Making and Cognition in Multi-Echelon Supply Chains: An Experimental Study." Production and Operations Management, vol. 24, no. 8, 2015, pp. 1216-1234, onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/poms.12343/abstract
Moritz B. B., Siemsen E., Kremer M., "Judgmental Forecasting: Cognitive Reflection and Decision Speed." Production and Operations Management, vol. 23, no. 7, 2014, pp. 1146-1160, onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/poms.12105/full
Moritz B. B., Hill A. V., Donohue K., "Individual Differences in the Newsvendor Problem: Behavior and Cognitive Reflection." Journal of Operations Management, vol. 31, 2013, pp. 72-85, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027269631200085X
Kremer M., Moritz B. B., Siemsen E., "Demand Forecasting Behavior: System Neglect and Change Detection." Management Science, vol. 57, no. 10, 2011, pp. 1827-1843, pubsonline.informs.org/doi/abs/10.1287/mnsc.1110.1382

Research Impact and Media Mention

"Rodless Pneumatic Cylinder", US Patent and Trademark Office, US Patent 6,336,393

Editorships

Decision Sciences Journal, Associate Editor, November 2017 - Present
Reviewer since 2013, Associate Editor since 2017.
Production and Operations Management, Editorial Board, January 2016 - Present
Journal of Operations Management, Editorial Board, January 2014 - Present