Charlene Zietsma

Color portrait of Charlene Zietsma

Associate Professor, John and Becky Surma Dean's Research Fellow

Department Management and Organization
Office Address 416 Business Building, Smeal College of Business
Phone Number 814-865-2643
Email Address cuz147@psu.edu

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Charlene Zietsma is Associate Professor, and John & Becky Surma Dean's Research Fellow, Management and Organization at the Smeal College of Business, Pennsylvania State University. She earned her doctorate at the University of British Columbia, Canada.

Charlene focuses on contexts involving significant, large-scale change. She studies institutional work, institutional change processes, social and sustainable entrepreneurship and social emotions usually in the context of social and ecological issues and social movements. Charlene is also leading an international research project focusing on managing entrepreneurial firms through rapid growth. She has lectured extensively on these topics in a number of countries around the world and her work has been published in Administrative Science Quarterly, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Organization Science, Organization Studies, Journal of Business Venturing and others. In 2016, she was awarded the ASQ Scholarly Contribution Award for the paper published in 2010 that has had the most significant impact on the field of organization studies. She is a Senior Editor for Organization Studies, has been guest editor for special issues in Business & Society, Research in the Sociology of Organizations, Strategic Organization and Organization Studies, and serves on the editorial board for several other journals. Charlene has held a Chair of Excellence at Universidad Carlos III, Madrid, as well as visiting scholar appointments at the University Technology Sydney, University of Sydney, Queensland University, Queensland University of Technology and the University of Liverpool.

Expertise

Processes of social change; institutional theory; social innovation; entrepreneurial growth; social movements; emotions and institutions; institutional fields.

Education

Ph D, Organizational Behavior, University of British Columbia, 2003

MBA, Strategy, Human Resources, Simon Fraser University, 1996

BA, Psychology (Economics), WIlfrid Laurier University, 1985

Courses Taught

MGMT 590 – Colloquium (3)
Continuing seminars which consist of a series of individual lectures by faculty, students, or outside speakers.

MGMT 601 – Ph.D Dis Full-Time
NO DESCRIPTION.

MGMT 821 – COMPLEX NEGOT (3)
The purpose of this course is to understand the theory and practice of negotiation in a variety of settings, with specific emphasis on multiparty contexts. A basic premise of the course is that while a manager needs analytical skills to discover optimal solutions to problems, a broad array of negotiation skills and an understanding of multiparty dynamics are needed in order for these solutions to be accepted and implemented. The course will allow students to develop these skills experientially and to understand negotiation in useful analytical frameworks. This course will give students an overview of the unique challenges and intricacies associated with multiparty negotiation, providing an opportunity to understand and develop applied skills regarding (a) the formulation of strategy and tactics before, during, and after a negotiation, and (b) third-party intervention in multiparty negotiation. Students will learn the structural and social characteristics of multiparty negotiation and develop techniques for managing its complexity.

BA 571 – Strat Mgmt (2)
Analysis and application of concepts and techniques aimed at successfully developing and implementing competitive strategy in a complex business environment. B A 571 B A 571 Strategic Management for Converging Economies (3)This course introduces students to the field of strategic management and the skills and tools used by general managers to make strategic decisions. Students learn to use frameworks and perspectives for analyzing industries, competitors, and companies with an overall objective of positioning the firm to attain and sustain competitive advantage. Students learn how to identify the industry and firm-level determinants of profitability and then relate those factors to the development of competitive strategy within the context of responsible business practice. Students also learn how to evaluate strategies to understand how and why companies are successful or not. Finally, students will learn how senior managers use integrative approaches for solving strategic problems.

ENGR 425 – New Venture (3)
Via problem-based learning, teams define new business ventures to meet current market needs, develop business plans, and present to investors. ENGR 425ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 425 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3) The goal of ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 425 is to better prepare undergraduate students to be business leaders in adaptive, globally-minded, technology-savvy companies. The course is structured so students develop skills that are of high value in any workplace: they develop improved leadership skills, higher self-efficacy, creativity and the ability to deal with ambiguity. On course completion, students will have a working knowledge of traditional and non-traditional ways for identifying a new product or business opportunity, quantifying the potential, understanding the key competitive factors, researching the audience and producing a convincing executive summary for internal or external financing and launch. Students who want to augment the skills and knowledge from their major with the ability to refine a new product/service process in an interdisciplinary team will find ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 425 a valuable course.This is a novel problem-based learning (PBL) course, where the learning is student-centered, with faculty acting primarily in the role of facilitators. Active learning happens in this course because students develop ownership in their new business venture concept and are fully responsible for the genesis of the idea. The course leverages the on-line course management system (ANGEL) to define weekly learning objectives, support electronic delivery of assignments, robust video content with entrepreneurs is provided on CD-ROM or via ANGEL, providing additional insights into entrepreneurship. The technology or business segment focus of the class is easily adapted by using different case studies and course mentors.This will be one of two courses in the new two-course sequence for business students in entrepreneurship. This course will be accepted as a supporting course in the Engineering Entrepreneurship Minor (E-SHIP) and in the Engineering Leadership Development Minor (ELDM). ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 425 can be used as a technical elective in many of the engineering departments. It will be accepted as a Support of Option course for the Information Sciences and Technology (IST) major.This course will be offered each Fall and Spring semester with two sections each semester. Class enrollment per section will be set at 60 total.

IST 425 – New Venture (3)
Via problem-based learning, teams define new business ventures to meet current market needs, develop business plans, and present to investors. ENGR 425ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 425 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3) The goal of ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 425 is to better prepare undergraduate students to be business leaders in adaptive, globally-minded, technology-savvy companies. The course is structured so students develop skills that are of high value in any workplace: they develop improved leadership skills, higher self-efficacy, creativity and the ability to deal with ambiguity. On course completion, students will have a working knowledge of traditional and non-traditional ways for identifying a new product or business opportunity, quantifying the potential, understanding the key competitive factors, researching the audience and producing a convincing executive summary for internal or external financing and launch. Students who want to augment the skills and knowledge from their major with the ability to refine a new product/service process in an interdisciplinary team will find ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 425 a valuable course.This is a novel problem-based learning (PBL) course, where the learning is student-centered, with faculty acting primarily in the role of facilitators. Active learning happens in this course because students develop ownership in their new business venture concept and are fully responsible for the genesis of the idea. The course leverages the on-line course management system (ANGEL) to define weekly learning objectives, support electronic delivery of assignments, robust video content with entrepreneurs is provided on CD-ROM or via ANGEL, providing additional insights into entrepreneurship. The technology or business segment focus of the class is easily adapted by using different case studies and course mentors.This will be one of two courses in the new two-course sequence for business students in entrepreneurship. This course will be accepted as a supporting course in the Engineering Entrepreneurship Minor (E-SHIP) and in the Engineering Leadership Development Minor (ELDM). ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 425 can be used as a technical elective in many of the engineering departments. It will be accepted as a Support of Option course for the Information Sciences and Technology (IST) major.This course will be offered each Fall and Spring semester with two sections each semester. Class enrollment per section will be set at 60 total.

MGMT 425 – New Venture (3)
Via problem-based learning, teams define new business ventures to meet current market needs, develop business plans, and present to investors. ENGR 425ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 425 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3) The goal of ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 425 is to better prepare undergraduate students to be business leaders in adaptive, globally-minded, technology-savvy companies. The course is structured so students develop skills that are of high value in any workplace: they develop improved leadership skills, higher self-efficacy, creativity and the ability to deal with ambiguity. On course completion, students will have a working knowledge of traditional and non-traditional ways for identifying a new product or business opportunity, quantifying the potential, understanding the key competitive factors, researching the audience and producing a convincing executive summary for internal or external financing and launch. Students who want to augment the skills and knowledge from their major with the ability to refine a new product/service process in an interdisciplinary team will find ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 425 a valuable course.This is a novel problem-based learning (PBL) course, where the learning is student-centered, with faculty acting primarily in the role of facilitators. Active learning happens in this course because students develop ownership in their new business venture concept and are fully responsible for the genesis of the idea. The course leverages the on-line course management system (ANGEL) to define weekly learning objectives, support electronic delivery of assignments, robust video content with entrepreneurs is provided on CD-ROM or via ANGEL, providing additional insights into entrepreneurship. The technology or business segment focus of the class is easily adapted by using different case studies and course mentors.This will be one of two courses in the new two-course sequence for business students in entrepreneurship. This course will be accepted as a supporting course in the Engineering Entrepreneurship Minor (E-SHIP) and in the Engineering Leadership Development Minor (ELDM). ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 425 can be used as a technical elective in many of the engineering departments. It will be accepted as a Support of Option course for the Information Sciences and Technology (IST) major.This course will be offered each Fall and Spring semester with two sections each semester. Class enrollment per section will be set at 60 total.

Selected Publications

Zietsma C., Toubiana M., "Emotions as the glue, the fuel and the rust of social innovation.." Handbook of Inclusive Innovation, (Edward Elgar), 2019, pp. 322-341., Invited
Barbera Thomas D., Castello I., de Bakker F., Zietsma C., "Energizing Through Visuals: How Social Entrepreneurs Use Emotion-Symbolic Work for Social Change." Academy of Management Journal, 2019
Zietsma C., Toubiana M., Voronov M., Roberts A., "Emotions in Organization Theory." Cambridge Elements on Organization Theory book series, (Cambridge University Press), 2019, Invited
Zietsma C., Ruebottom T., Slade Shantz A., "Unobtrusive maintenance: temporal complexity, latent category control and the stalled emergence of the cleantech sector." Journal of Management Studies, vol. 55, no. 7, 2018, pp. 1242-1277
Ringel L., Hiller P., Zietsma C., "Toward Permeable Boundaries of Organizations? Introduction to the volume. In L. Ringel, P. Hiller, & C. Zietsma (Eds.)." Research in the Sociology of Organizations, (Emerald Publishing), vol. 57, 2018, pp. 3-28, Invited
Roberts A., Zietsma C., "Working for an App: Organizational Boundaries, Roles and Meaning of Work in the "On-Demand" Economy. In L. Ringel, P. Hiller, & C. Zietsma (Eds.) Towards permeable boundaries of organizations." Research in the Sociology of Organizations, (Emerald Publishing), vol. 57, 2018, pp. 195-225
Shantz A. S., Kistruck G., Zietsma C., "The Opportunity Not Taken: The Occupational Identity of Entrepreneurs in Contexts of Poverty." Journal of Business Venturing, vol. 33, no. 4, 2018, pp. 427-443
McKnight B., Zietsma C., "Finding the threshold: A configurational approach to optimal distinctiveness.." Journal of Business Venturing, vol. 33, no. 4, 2018, pp. 493-512
Van Wijk J., Zietsma C., Dorado S., de Bakker F., Marti I., "SOCIAL INNOVATION: Integrating micro, meso and macro level insights from institutional theory." Business & Society, 2018
Zietsma C., Toubiana M., "The valuable, the constitutive and the energetic: Exploring the impact and importance of studying emotions and institutions." Organization Studies, vol. 39, no. 4, 2018, pp. 427-443
Branzei O., Frooman J., McKnight B., Zietsma C., "Investor's assessment of the impact of corporate social performance on default risk in long-term bond markets." Journal of Business Ethics, vol. 148, no. 1, 2018, pp. 183-203
Fan G. H., Zietsma C., "Constructing a Shared Governance Logic: The Role of Emotions in Enabling Dually Embedded Agency." Academy of Management Journal, vol. 60, no. 6, 2017, pp. 2321-2351
Toubiana M., Greenwood R., Zietsma C., "Beyond Ethos: Outlining an Alternate Trajectory for Emotional Competence and Investment." Academy of Management Review, vol. 42, no. 3, 2017, pp. 551-556
Toubiana M., Zietsma C., "The message is on the wall? Emotions, social media and the dynamics of institutional complexity." Academy of Management Journal, vol. 60, no. 3, 2017, pp. 922–953
Hinings C. R., Logue D., Zietsma C., "Fields, Governance and Institutional Infrastructure." The SAGE Handbook of Organizational Institutionalism, (SAGE), 2017, pp. 163-189., Invited
Zietsma C., Groenewegen P., Logue D., Hinings C. R., "Field or fields? Building the scaffolding for cumulation of research on institutional fields." Academy of Management Annals, vol. 11, no. 1, 2017, pp. 391-450
Vermeulen P. A., Zietsma C., Greenwood R., Langley A., "Strategic responses to institutional complexity." Strategic Organization, vol. 14, no. 4, 2016, pp. 277–286, Invited
McKague K., Zietsma C., Oliver C., "Building the social structure of a market." Organization Studies, vol. 36, no. 8, 2015, pp. 1063–1093
Raaijmakers A. G., Vermeulen P. A., Meeus M. T., Zietsma C., "I need time! Exploring pathways to compliance under institutional complexity." Academy of Management Journal, vol. 58, no. 1, 2015, pp. 85–110
Leung A., Zietsma C., Peredo A. M., "Emergent Identity Work and Institutional Change: The ‘Quiet’Revolution of Japanese Middle-Class Housewives." Organization Studies, vol. 35, no. 1, 2014, pp. 423–450
van Wijk J., Stam W., Elfring T., Zietsma C., den Hond F., "Activists and incumbents structuring change: The interplay of agency, culture and networks in field evolution." Academy of Management Journal, vol. 55, no. 2, 2013
Zietsma C., Lawrence T. B., "Institutional work in the transformation of an organizational field: The interplay of boundary work and practice work." Administrative Science Quarterly, vol. 55, no. 2, 2010, pp. 189–221
Zietsma C., McKnight B., "Building the iron cage: institutional creation work in the context of competing protoinstitutions." Institutional work: Actors and agency in institutional studies of organizations, (Cambridge University Press), 2009, pp. 143–177, Invited
Zietsma C., Winn M. I., "Building chains and directing flows: Strategies and tactics of mutual influence in stakeholder conflicts." Business & Society, vol. 47, no. 1, 2008, pp. 68–101
Winn M. I., MacDonald P., Zietsma C., "Managing industry reputation: The dynamic tension between collective and competitive reputation management strategies." Corporate Reputation Review, vol. 11, no. 1, 2008, pp. 35–55
Moore D. A., Oesch J. M., Zietsma C., "What competition? Myopic self-focus in market-entry decisions." Organization Science, vol. 18, no. 3, 2007, pp. 440–454
Zietsma C., Winn M. I., "Reflections on process and process theorizing: revisiting our work “Organizational field power dynamics and the ‘War of the Woods’”." 2005
Cardon M. S., Zietsma C., Saparito P., Matherne B. P., Davis C., "A tale of passion: New insights into entrepreneurship from a parenthood metaphor." Journal of Business Venturing, vol. 20, no. 1, 2005, pp. 23–45
Winn M. I., Zietsma C., "The War of the Woods: A Forestry Giant Seeks Peace." Greener Management International, no. 48, 2004, pp. 21–37
Amit R., MacCrimmon K. R., Zietsma C., Oesch J. M., "Does money matter?: Wealth attainment as the motive for initiating growth-oriented technology ventures." Journal of business venturing, vol. 16, no. 2, 2001, pp. 119–143

Editorships

Academy of Management Review, Editorial Board, (aom.org/Publications/AMR/Academy-of-Management-Review.aspx), January 2019 - Present
Journal of Business Venturing, Editorial Board, (www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-business-venturing), October 2017 - Present
Organization Studies, Associate Editor, (journals.sagepub.com/home/oss), July 2013 - Present