Jeanette K. Miller

Color portrait of Jeanette K. Miller

Assistant Clinical Professor, Associate Director of Farrell Center for Corporate Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Department Management and Organization

Email Address jkm358@psu.edu

Download Photo

Courses Taught

ENTR 502 – NEW VENTURE CREATE (3)
ENTR 502 focuses on the process of launching a new venture, in a corporate setting or as a new startup, including identifying a problem or market opportunity, developing business models, forming a team, financing, analyzing markets, assessing the competitive environment, and planning to acquire leadership talent. A business model canvas framework is used as the primary tool for describing, analyzing, and designing business models. In essence, this course identifies and defines the key components necessary to develop a formal business plan. Concepts and techniques explore new venture creation business strategies, including different approaches for business model development. Students will gain insight into how to translate new ideas into viable projects and business ventures. Students will learn the importance of understanding markets, customer segments, and the competitive landscape, as well as how to obtain funding for new ventures. Lastly, the issue of how to acquire leadership and human resource talent to make a new venture viable over time is investigated.

MGMT 427W – MANAGING A STARTUP (3)
Start-up companies have a high failure rate. Acquiring and balancing limited resources, changing direction quickly, building a coherent team, developing an organization┬┐s culture from scratch, managing intellectual property, and creating new markets all test a wide range of managerial skills not usually demanded in one person within a larger organization. Whereas a large company has a strong and well-defined structure and ample resources to deal with unexpected challenges, a start-up usually has insufficient resources and/or management experience, yet it must deal on a daily basis with important and often unpredictable forces. Students will be exposed to these tensions and experience through problem-based learning methods that illustrate what it is like to start and grow a new company. The course will provide students with the knowledge and experience to increase their likelihood of success whether as a principal in a small company or an investor representative. Managing a Startup is a problem-based learning (PBL) course, where the learning is student-centered, with faculty acting primarily in the role of facilitators. Active learning happens in this course because students are engaged in the analysis of the complex situations that underlie startup companies. The course leverages the on-line course management system to define weekly learning objectives, support electronic delivery of assignments and provide robust video content from entrepreneurs, investors and key employees, who provide additional insights into the management decisions and ethical dilemmas the leader of a startup faces. Because the course is structured around the on-line course management system, it could be offered at any Penn State location with very little revision. The particular companies and cases that are the focus of the class are easily adapted by using different case studies, companies and course mentors.

MGMT 427 – Managing A Startup (3)
Exploration of the tensions and experiences of starting and growing a new company. MGMT 427 Managing an Entrepreneurial Start-Up Company (3)Start-up companies have a high failure rate. Acquiring and balancing limited resources, changing direction quickly, building a coherent team, managing intellectual property, and creating new markets all test a wide range of managerial skills not usually demanded in one person within a larger organization. Whereas a large company has a strong and well-defined structure and ample resources to deal with unexpected challenges, a start-up usually has insufficient resources, or management experience and yet must deal with daily important and often unpredictable forces. It is the tenacity of an entrepreneur that can take a company through the valleys of despair to eventually succeed. Students will be exposed to these tensions and experience through problem-based learning methods what it is like to start and grow a new company. The course will provide students with knowledge and experience to increase the likelihood of success whether as a principal in a small company or an investor representative.

Editorship

Engaged Management Review, Editorial Board, (emr.case.edu/about/editorial-team), July 2018 - Present