Rick Martin Weyer

Color portrait of Rick Martin Weyer

Instructor

Department Management and Organization
Office Address 429 Business Building
Phone Number 814-867-0064
Email Address rmw4@psu.edu

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I have direct experience as a research engineer with expertise in acoustics and fluid mechanics. I have also practiced as and intellectual property technology licensing officer. I have been part of three startup companies.

Education

MBA, MBA, The Pennsylvania State University, 1998

MS, Ocean Engineering (fluid mechanics, acoustics, oceanography), University of Rhode Island, 1984

BS, Aerospace and Ocean Engineering, Virginia Tech, 1981

Courses Taught

ENGR 426 – Invention Commerci (3)
Working with Penn State inventions selected by the Intellectual Property Office, student teams define an optimum commercialization path each technology. ENGR 426ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 426 Invention Commercialization (3) The goal of ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 426 is to have students understand why invention commercialization is complicated and difficult by participating in the process. For example, the inventor rarely has insights into the markets for his/her invention, is often not interested in the details of commercialization, and can be secretive. In addition, the business and financial communities often do not take the time, or have the resources, to understand new technologies and perform complex due diligence. Thus lack of due diligence often leads to rejection of innovation because existing companies often discount new technologies from outside the company as NIH - "not invented here".Effective transfer of new invention or innovation to a commercial product requires at least three different functional communities to interface: technical, legal and business. Each uses a different language, comes from different educational and cultural backgrounds, and may have an inherent distrust of the others. These functional barriers are difficult to overcome.This course teaches how these barriers can be broken down as student teams help bridge the perceived chasm between key players in the invention commercialization process. In these teams, students bring the skills and knowledge from their major to develop an invention commercialization recommendation for the Technology Transfer Office and the inventor. For example, business students focus on finance and market opportunity assessment; engineering and IST students focus on design refinements, prototyping support, and (if appropriate) making technology suggestions to the inventor.Upon completing the course, the students will have a working knowledge of different university and corporate technology or invention commercialization processes, important intellectual property management tools for inventions (patents, license agreements, option agreements) source of funding to move inventions toward product development, and delivering top quality presentations which outline the recommended commercialization path. Students who enjoy open-ended projects which involve the interplay of business and invention of who wants to work on interdisciplinary teams with the newest inventions will find this course a valuable course. NOTE: Because the inventions/products are based on Penn State faculty intellectual property, students must sign the Penn State Special Intellectual Property Agreement For Students - For Use When Assigning Intellectual Property to The Pennsylvania State University. The form can be viewed at http://guru.psu.edu/policies/RAG13.htmlThe course will be offered both Spring and Fall semesters with an enrollment of 40 students.

IST 426 – Invention Commerci (3)
Working with Penn State inventions selected by the Intellectual Property Office, student teams define an optimum commercialization path each technology. ENGR 426ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 426 Invention Commercialization (3) The goal of ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 426 is to have students understand why invention commercialization is complicated and difficult by participating in the process. For example, the inventor rarely has insights into the markets for his/her invention, is often not interested in the details of commercialization, and can be secretive. In addition, the business and financial communities often do not take the time, or have the resources, to understand new technologies and perform complex due diligence. Thus lack of due diligence often leads to rejection of innovation because existing companies often discount new technologies from outside the company as NIH - "not invented here".Effective transfer of new invention or innovation to a commercial product requires at least three different functional communities to interface: technical, legal and business. Each uses a different language, comes from different educational and cultural backgrounds, and may have an inherent distrust of the others. These functional barriers are difficult to overcome.This course teaches how these barriers can be broken down as student teams help bridge the perceived chasm between key players in the invention commercialization process. In these teams, students bring the skills and knowledge from their major to develop an invention commercialization recommendation for the Technology Transfer Office and the inventor. For example, business students focus on finance and market opportunity assessment; engineering and IST students focus on design refinements, prototyping support, and (if appropriate) making technology suggestions to the inventor.Upon completing the course, the students will have a working knowledge of different university and corporate technology or invention commercialization processes, important intellectual property management tools for inventions (patents, license agreements, option agreements) source of funding to move inventions toward product development, and delivering top quality presentations which outline the recommended commercialization path. Students who enjoy open-ended projects which involve the interplay of business and invention of who wants to work on interdisciplinary teams with the newest inventions will find this course a valuable course. NOTE: Because the inventions/products are based on Penn State faculty intellectual property, students must sign the Penn State Special Intellectual Property Agreement For Students - For Use When Assigning Intellectual Property to The Pennsylvania State University. The form can be viewed at http://guru.psu.edu/policies/RAG13.htmlThe course will be offered both Spring and Fall semesters with an enrollment of 40 students.

MGMT 426 – Invention Commerci (3)
Working with Penn State inventions selected by the Intellectual Property Office, student teams define an optimum commercialization path each technology. ENGR 426ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 426 Invention Commercialization (3) The goal of ENGR (MGMT/IST/ENTR) 426 is to have students understand why invention commercialization is complicated and difficult by participating in the process. For example, the inventor rarely has insights into the markets for his/her invention, is often not interested in the details of commercialization, and can be secretive. In addition, the business and financial communities often do not take the time, or have the resources, to understand new technologies and perform complex due diligence. Thus lack of due diligence often leads to rejection of innovation because existing companies often discount new technologies from outside the company as NIH - "not invented here".Effective transfer of new invention or innovation to a commercial product requires at least three different functional communities to interface: technical, legal and business. Each uses a different language, comes from different educational and cultural backgrounds, and may have an inherent distrust of the others. These functional barriers are difficult to overcome.This course teaches how these barriers can be broken down as student teams help bridge the perceived chasm between key players in the invention commercialization process. In these teams, students bring the skills and knowledge from their major to develop an invention commercialization recommendation for the Technology Transfer Office and the inventor. For example, business students focus on finance and market opportunity assessment; engineering and IST students focus on design refinements, prototyping support, and (if appropriate) making technology suggestions to the inventor.Upon completing the course, the students will have a working knowledge of different university and corporate technology or invention commercialization processes, important intellectual property management tools for inventions (patents, license agreements, option agreements) source of funding to move inventions toward product development, and delivering top quality presentations which outline the recommended commercialization path. Students who enjoy open-ended projects which involve the interplay of business and invention of who wants to work on interdisciplinary teams with the newest inventions will find this course a valuable course. NOTE: Because the inventions/products are based on Penn State faculty intellectual property, students must sign the Penn State Special Intellectual Property Agreement For Students - For Use When Assigning Intellectual Property to The Pennsylvania State University. The form can be viewed at http://guru.psu.edu/policies/RAG13.htmlThe course will be offered both Spring and Fall semesters with an enrollment of 40 students.

MGMT 215 – Entr Mindset (3)
This course provides the opportunity to learn to think like an entrepreneur in the broader context of social entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship, creative problem solving, opportunity recognition, and innovation. MGMT 215 Entrepreneurial Mindset (3) An entrepreneurial mindset can be applied to different situations such as social entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship, creative problem solving, opportunity recognition, technology management, innovation and career development, etc. The skills and attributes of an entrepreneurial mindset can be used to expand career options and career paths for students in any major. Students will develop self-efficacy, leadership, recognition of new opportunities, resourcefulness, creativity and comfort with ambiguity. Further, this course will help students develop an appreciation for mistakes and failure as valuable learning opportunities. Through experiential exercises and problem based learning the student will be afforded the opportunity to study, apply and absorb an entrepreneurial mindset as an approach to viewing the world, to recognizing opportunities and to developing novel solutions. After taking this course the student, regardless of a student's major or college, will have a greater understanding of how to apply entrepreneurial thinking to problems and adopt entrepreneurial solutions to those problems to transform them from problems into opportunities.

MGMT 496 – Indep Studies (Variable)
Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.

Selected Publication

Weyer R., Cornillon P., Flierl G., "Translational Velocity of Warm Core Rings Relative to the Slope Water." Journal of Physical Oceanography, 1989